RULES OF THE ROAD



  1. The “two second” rule: Stay 2 seconds behind the vehicle in front of you. Don’t tailgate. I allow three. Expect people to cut in front of you, but you’ll be safer in the long run.

  2. Assume every other driver is texting! Assume a car will run the red light.

  3. All trucks will drop something in front of you or coming toward you, from sand & grit to rocks & boxes & blown tires. Dump trucks are the worst offenders. Don’t ride behind them. It’s also blind behind them. Stay back or pass safely.

  4. Assume there is something on the road ahead day or night. Your job is to find it.

  5. Don’t run blind in the fog or smoke or in a white out or dirt storm. Nobody else can see either and will be stopped in front of you.

  6. Don’t run in a pack. Get out of a pack. Let the pack go by. Drive between packs on the interstates.

  7. Be courteous - Road Rage is dangerous for you and/or the other guy! Be patient. Let the other guy go. There are some real nuts out there. It’s not worth it. Be courteous.

  8. Always look in the direction your vehicle is going. Keep your eyes moving from side to side as you drive down the road. Note that the front left fender swings out when you are backing to the right. Don’t look at the passenger you’re talking to.

  9. When driving between two parked cars look straight ahead not at the cars and you will make it Just fine.

  10. Watch out. A child will be chasing a ball into the street in a residential area. Be ready. Also watch for bicyclists to the right and pedestrians stepping off the curve when you are turning right.

  11. A car door will open as you pass by a row of parked cars.

  12. Deer come in threes + Break and use caution. In today’s cars, you can slam on the brakes while steering around the object.

  13. When merging, there will be a car in the blind spot to your left.

  14. Have situational awareness at all times. Know where cars are around you at all times! Have a plan for where you are going in an emergency maneuver. And do your braking while still on the pavement. If you slip off the right side, don’t brake; just ease back onto the road with no sudden motions

  15. Know your vehicle and how it will perform in an emergency steering and/or stopping situation. Practice in a safe place.

  16. Drive apart from other vehicles.

  17. When passing on the interstate accelerate slightly to pass. Don’t hang out in the Mumfort lane - oblivious, with your cruise control on.

  18. Watch for Smokey Bear.

  19. Are you always in a hurry? Change your lifestyle not your life. Leave 3 to 5 minutes earlier.

  20. Drive with both hands on the wheel at 9:15, thumbs up. The air bag will deploy properly.

  21. Accelerate extra slowly in ice and snow. Pump the brakes gently.

  22. Take your cell phone with you. But don’t use it while moving. Hands free voice command is acceptable. And don’t, don’t, DON’T text, read or write while driving. Don’t eat either or primp in the mirror.

  23. Buckle up.Everyone! Car seats for children and keep them away from airbags.

  24. Don’t drink & drive. At the very least use a designated driver.

  25. How to parallel park: Pull up beside and 2 feet from the parked car in front. Turn the wheel all the way toward the curb and back up until you are looking at the parked car’s back bumper. Turn the wheel all the way in the opposite direction and back into the spot.

  26. When parking: Downhill turn your wheels to the curb. Uphill turn your wheels away from the curb. Set the emergency brake and leave in reverse gear (standard shift) or in “Park”.

  27. Don’t slam the car door. Keep contact with door until it closes securely.

  28. Have your car serviced and check the tire pressure regularly.

  29. The time between the gas and the brake pedal is directly proportioned to the life of the car. Drive like you paid for the set of tires.

  30. At some point, the car will drive itself and we’ll be obsolete!




Author’s Note: I can’t let it go without telling the story behind the photo. My good friend Bill Goodson had a good friend and colleague, Dan Calhoun. Dan had always wanted to drive and Bill had just got